M83 – Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming M83 – Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming

M83 - Hurry Up, We're Dreaming

My wife once said the greatest thing about M83 was every song sounded like the ending to every great 80’s movie. There is some truth in that sentiment as the French project by Anthony Gonzalez drips a certain nostalgia and starry eyed optimism. The later work of electronic/dream pop act M83 strives towards the recreation of memories of the 1980’s. While beginning in some weird electronic haze, M83 has begun a slow ascent towards a explosion of elation and triumph. Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming is the sixth record from M83 and attempts to be the definitive work in a long career of success.

Before the album was released, Anthony Gonzalez described the new record as “very, very, very epic.” In context, almost all of M83’s records are grand in scale even when preformed with restraint. Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming is said to be based on dreams and the difference between ages of the dreamer. It is about fantasy worlds experienced as an adult and the wonder of imagination. This concept is not far from dream pop’s ability set but provides context for the forthcoming release. I could hear this record before it arrived. It screams for attention through careful whispers.

Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming is a double disc album. Gonzalez desire for a double record was influenced by Melancholy and the Infinite Sadness and also a time when double disc records meant something. While some people raise an eyebrow to the double or triple disc records, some of us have been listening to progressive metal so this is child’s play. The length of this record could either mean it is full of filler throughout or arresting content for the majority. Thank the gods it is the later.

The first single “Midnight City” gave the listeners a glimpse at a lush world constructed with synths, processed vocals and surprising yet oddly fitting saxophone solo. “Midnight City” is only the beginning of the heights exercised by the record and is only the start to a movie with a 70 minute ending. I have been looking for the right time to say this so I might as well do it now. Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming is one best records of 2011. This conclusion does not come from a long M83 fan but a casual one. Throughout the entirety of this record, the listener is actively engaged in Gonzalez’s world of half shared memories. It takes a special type of album to convince the listener of the existence of hope and the fact that a desire for love does not have to be cheesy.

Everything is near perfect and comes with immediate gratification. The entire album is a list of emotionally reveling tracks connected by a series of equally interesting interludes. It baffles me how much this album climbed on top of me. From the slightly eerie choir and piano ballad of “Splendor” to the bright and bombastic landscape of “Echoes Of Mine,” Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming is as every bit fascinating as the dream pop and shoegaze titans of yesterday. Perhaps that is one of the best qualities of this record. Instead of a shallow and meaningless throwback to past, M83 employs past styles into a work which is as apart of today as it is past. It is 2011 as much as it is 1985.

Gonzalez said this record was “a reflection of my 30 years as a human being.” Why does he get to have a epic tribute and I don’t? For my birthday, instead of dinner at Outback, sex and a six pack of craft beer, I want a four disc album based on my existence and the impact it has made. I mean, we can still go to Outback and keep the sex and beer but this year will be marked by something more sublime.

Tracklist:
CD1

Intro (feat. Zola Jesus)
Midnight City
Reunion
Where the Boats Go
Wait
Raconte-Moi Histoire
Train to Pluton
Claudia Lewis
This Bright Flash
When Will You Come Home?
Soon, My Friend

CD2

My Tears Are Becoming a Sea
New Map
OK Pal
Another Wave From You
Splendor
Year One, One UFO
Fountains
Steve McQueen
Echoes of Mine
Klaus I Love You
Outro

M83 - Hurry Up, We're Dreaming, reviewed by Kaptain Carbon on 2011-10-20T09:45:29+00:00 rating 4.5 out of 5



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